Assorted Items

Assorted Items


This is a range of different items that do not fit into any of the other categories.
Compasses

Compasses


A compass is an instrument used for navigation and orientation, especially at sea. The magnetised needle shows direction relative to the geographic cardinal directions; North, South, East, and West.
Kaleidoscopes & Teleidoscopes

Kaleidoscopes & Teleidoscopes


Kaleidoscopes look a little bit like a small telescope that you can hold in your hands. One end has a hole you can look into. The other end has translucent paper or other material that lets light in. Inside the kaleidoscope, there are mirrors arranged in a circle, as well as a variety of colourful objects, like beads, pebbles or small pieces of glass, that are free to move around. As you look through the viewer and rotate the outside of the kaleidoscope, the mirrors reflect the movement of the small objects to create fascinating visual images that change with each movement.

 

 

Key Rings

Key Rings


All key rings are miniature versions of larger pieces. They make excellent inexpensive gifts for children.
Sextants

Sextants


Sextants are navigating instruments used to calculate the distance between two points. They were used extensively on ships before the invention of GPS (Global Positioning System). Even today, big ships are all required to carry working sextants, and navigating officers have regular routines to keep themselves familiar with making it work. Despite all the GPS, gyro compasses and radio communications; it is at the end of the day an instrument that does not require any electricity or power of any sort to make it work. So when all else fails, a sextant can still work.

Sundials

Sundials


A sundial is a clock that uses the position of the Sun to indicate the time. Typically a rod casts a shadow upon a plane or surface. On this surface are found markings that indicate the time by the position of the shadow. The sundial was first invented in the 15th century. They were very common throughout the 17th & 18th centuries because all mechanical clocks required a sundial to check that it was keeping correct time. Anyone who possessed a watch was very likely to also own a pocket sundial. Since every town & locality had its own time, people required a sundial or clock to tell the time. By the 1850's this had all changed because the railways needed to keep the same time throughout a journey. So they adopted Greenwich as the standard time. After which the sundial ceases to be of any practical importance and remains merely as a decorative object.

Surveying Instruments

Surveying Instruments


Our range of surveying instruments can find their roots in England following the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII in 1539. The new owners favoured by the king needed to have their land divided.
Levelling is the art of finding a line parallel to the horizon at one or more stations, in order to discover by how much one plane is higher than another. This is essential when cutting canals & other forms of building. Allowance has to be made for the curvature of the Earth during construction.
Theodolites were first invented in the mid-16th century. They are regarded as the most important of the surveying instruments, because they can measure horizontal angles between two points and their angle of elevation at the same time.
Telephones

Telephones


All the telephones that we sell are fully functional and compatible with modern telephone systems across the globe. They are sold with the USA style telephone jack.
If the telephone is used outside of the UK, an adapter is provided and can be attached so the telephone can function in the relevant country.
However, if it's intended to be used in the UK, we will attach an adapter so the telephone can be plugged into a wall socket.
Telescopes

Telescopes


The telescopes we sell are all 'refractors' which were popular during the 17th and 18th centuries. This means the telescopes have 2-3 lens within the brass pipes and an objective lens at the opposite end to the eyepiece. The handheld & pocket telescopes are small and compact, having shorter sections of tube nestled into each other